Showing posts with label BRANDS. Show all posts
Showing posts with label BRANDS. Show all posts

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Brain power------GE



That’s what we call brain power ;)



K@run@

Sunday, December 18, 2011

F18 cockpit footage makes you want to be a fighter pilot


I wanted to be a pilot

It’s something 99% of us will never experience, and at the same time anyone getting the opportunity will probably find every roller-coaster boring afterwards. But through the use of a GoPro camera, we can all get a better idea of what it’s like to sit inside an F-18 during take-off and in flight.
The speed of such a craft can’t really be imagined unless you’ve been in something similar on the ground, such as in a very fast car on a track day. Even then, you won’t get the sense of maneuverability as can be seen when the other F-18 pulls a left turn during the video and just disappears. I also like the way those droplets of water disappear from the canopy when both engines kick in for take-off.
In an age that sees us need to replace our computers every few years, and where we change our cars on a similar schedule, it’s incredible to think the F-18 Super Hornet has been flying since 1995. The smaller Hornet model has been flying since 1978. The supersonic jet can reach Mach 1.8 (1,190mph) and carries bombs, missiles, and a Vulcan nose-mounted gatling gun firing 20mm rounds. The range of the Super Hornet is 2,346km.
I’m not sure what the exact GoPro model used was to capture this footage, but it doesn’t do the brand any harm to see it inside a jet. The footage is excellent, with no noticeable loss of quality even when capturing the rolls and loops the F-18 is performing.
So, who wants to be a fighter pilot?

K@run@

Sunday, December 4, 2011

VOLKSWAGEN--BUGATTI


The fastest and most expensive production car ever


When you're ripping along at 253 mph, your mind is not drifting aimlessly. Your senses are cranked up to full volume to detect any hint of impending catastrophe in the maelstrom of wind rush, tire thrum, mechanical thrash, and exhaust roar that surrounds you.
Is that slight shift in the whistling wind caused by a body panel coming loose? Does that vague vibration signal a tire starting to delaminate? Does that subtle new mechanical whine presage a failing bearing that's about to lock up the powertrain?
No such problem developed on the Bugatti Veyron 16.4, because it is not a half-baked aftermarket or boutique road burner. It is a production car developed and tested to the standards of Volkswagen, Bugatti's parent company. With a top speed of 253 mph, it is also the fastest production car ever built.
Production, of course, is a relative term. In the case of the Veyron, Bugatti plans to build only about 50 cars a year at a price of 1 million, which is about $1,250,000 as this is written. To this rarefied market Bugatti has brought an unusual level of sophistication and engineering necessitated by the promise of 1001 metric horsepower (or 987 American horses) and a top speed of 252 mph, a pledge from former VW boss Ferdinand Piëch when he unveiled the production-intent Veyron at the 2001 Geneva auto show.
Achieving 1000 horsepower in a racing engine is one thing, but to do so in a reliable, refined, durable, and emissions-legal configuration is much harder. The energizer in the Veyron is a WR16 displacing 7998cc and turbocharged with 15.8 psi of boost. You can think of it as two Passat WR8 engines put together and pumped up by four turbos.
But the Bugatti engine has more cylinders, more displacement, more power per liter, and more output overall than any other engine in the WR family tree. When I ask Bugatti development boss Wolfgang Schreiber to explain how the same engine can be rated at 1001 SAE net horsepower at 6000 rpm for the U.S. but only 987 horsepower (1001 PS) for Europe, he laughs, saying, "The production engines are all putting out between 1020 and 1040 PS, enough to cover both promises."
The engine's torque peak is equally mighty at 922 pound-feet, developed between 2200 and 5500 rpm. The four small turbos minimize throttle lag, and the 9.3:1 compression ratio ensures reasonable torque even before boost develops.
All that twist required a dedicated transmission. The Veyron gets a King Kong seven-speed version of VW's twin-clutch gearbox, called DSG. Like the DSG available in the Audi TT, it operates with an automatic mode or a full manual mode via paddle shifters. Because gearchanges occur with one clutch disengaging as the other engages, shifts are uniformly smooth and swift.
With about as much engine output as two Corvette Z06 V-8s, it's no surprise that Bugatti engineers decided to go with all-wheel drive. We don't have many details about the driveline, but the front-to-rear torque split is automatically adjusted to suit dynamic conditions and can range from 100 to 0 percent at either end.
An engine, particularly a turbocharged one, that develops four-digit power throws off more heat than a dozen pizza ovens. Consequently, in the nose of the Veyron are three coolant radiators, one heat exchanger for the twin air-to-liquid intercoolers, and two air-conditioning condensers. There are also transmission and differential oil coolers on the right side and a large engine-oil cooler in the left-side air intake. To help heat escape from the engine compartment, the big WR16 sits in the open, enclosed by no cover of any kind. This powertrain propels the 4300-pound Veyron as effortlessly and gracefully as Tiger Woods belts a 300-yard drive.
My experience with the car took place at Ehra-Lessien in Germany, Volkswagen's test track and high-speed theme park not far from VW headquarters in Wolfsburg. At least it will soon become a theme park because Bugatti plans to let Veyron owners bring their cars to this 13.0-mile circuit to explore the top speed of their cars. In addition to finding out how fast the Veyron can go, I was a guinea pig for this ultimate high-speed thrill ride.
We started with two familiarization laps to get a feel for the track and the car. The track is simple, with a pair of high-banked, 150-mph corners connected by two five-mile-long straights,one of which has a slight bend so that it touches a common parking area.
With the Veyron's high beltline, I couldn't see any of the front bodywork from the driver's seat, but the view of the pavement immediately in front of the car is excellent. The driving position is comfortable, with a snug sport seat that provides great lateral support and manual fore-and-aft and seatback-angle adjustments (a plusher power seat will be optional).
Even after it was lowered to my preferred position, the steering wheel did not obstruct my view of the instrument cluster. And despite the Veyron's low, 47.5-inch height, there was plenty of clearance between my helmeted head and the headliner. Schreiber promises the car will accommodate drivers as tall as six foot seven.
Although the Veyron idles with a quiet murmur, as soon as it starts rolling you hear a symphony of mechanical music that gives way to tire thrum when you get above 100 mph, which doesn't take long. We had no opportunity to perform acceleration testing, but the ease with which the Bugatti blows past that speed is astonishing. We predict about six seconds flat from a dead stop.
What's more, the acceleration doesn't slacken when you hit triple-digit speeds. In my first lap, I took the car up to about 185 mph, at which point the tire noise was fairly loud but the Veyron was otherwise calm and relaxed. One reason it felt so secure is that when you hit 137 mph, the Bugatti hunkers down, lowering its normal ride height of 4.9 inches to 3.1 in front and 3.7 in the rear. At the same time a small spoiler deploys from the rear bodywork and a wing extends about a foot, perched at a six-degree angle. Two underbody flaps ahead of the front tires also open up. This configuration produces substantial downforce, about 330 pounds in front and 440 in the rear at 230 mph.
Given that it only takes about 500 horsepower to overcome the prevailing drag at 185 mph, that leaves the 500 horses remaining for acceleration duty. So when you plant your right foot at 185, the Veyron's surge of power shoves you into the driver's seat about as hard as a Corvette's does at 100 mph, or a Ford Five Hundred's does at 40 mph. Accelerating from 185 to 230 on my next lap didn't take very long, and the car remained glued to the pavement, although wind roar overcame tire thrumming to become the predominant sound.
But 230 mph is about as fast as the Veyron will go until you put the car into top-speed mode. This involves coming to a stop and, while the car is idling, turning a key in a lock on the floor to the left of the driver's seat. When you do that, the car sinks down even lower on its suspension, until ground clearance has been reduced to a mere 2.6 inches in front and 2.8 in the rear. This setup also causes the front underbody flaps to close and the rear spoiler and wing to retract, although the wing remains tilted out of the body at a slight two-degree angle. These changes reduce the car's drag coefficient from 0.41 to 0.36, and they reduce the peak downforce from 770 to 120 pounds.

K@run@

Thursday, December 1, 2011

10 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT GOOGLE CHROMEBOOK

CHROME

      Google has designed Chrome OS keeping the Web in mind and most of its functionalities will be available only if the Chromebook is connected to the internet. Users apps, games, photos, music, movies and documents will all be on cloud.

The bare-bones operating system is essentially a Web browser that will guide users to applications like email and spreadsheets directly on the Web, instead of storing software such as, say, Outlook or Word on PCs.

Moving day-to-day functions onto the Internet removes the burden of time-consuming tasks associated with traditional PCs, like installing software and updates, backing up files and running antivirus checks.

As also mentioned before, everything is on the cloud. Hence the laptops will be tightly integrated with Google's "cloud" online services, and will have almost no capacity to store information. Though they will have slots to plug in other storages device users buy separately.

As with the company's mobile OS Android, Chrome software will be free.

Samsung Electronics Co and Acer Inc made the first Chromebooks.Both models will have keyboards, but no hard drives for storage. The machines will be like computer terminals dependent on a connection to the Internet. The laptops come with 16 gigabytes of flash memory -- the kind found in smartphones, tablet computers and some iPods. Google Chromebooks will run on Intel Corp's Atom chip.

While Google has diligently worked to make sure Chromebooks can be used offline, the computing model ultimately relies on being connected to the Internet.


The company claims that Chromebooks will be up and running in about eight seconds. Every time a user will turn it on, the software will check online to see if there are updates, and it will always boot up with the latest version.

In case, there's a failure, for whatever reason, the OS will simply reinstall itself.

Google Chromebook comes with security features such as secure tabbed browsing (called sandboxing), data encryption, and verified boot. According to Google, "Chromebooks have many layers of security built in so there is no anti-virus software to buy and maintain

K@run@

GE to Open New Global Software Headquarters in Bay Area, Hire 400 Software Engineers

REVOLUTIONIZE THE MODERN AGE



As the Internet evolved from the dial-up days of America Online to the always-on, cloud-dwelling social network, a parallel development has been taking place in the background: the digital web of the world’s trillions of machines.
Over the last several decades, GE’s software engineers have guided the growth of this emerging industrial Internet. Putting their brains and manufacturing skills to the task, they connected jet engines, power transformers, and medical devices to boost the efficiency of these complex systems and save customers money. With some 5,000 software engineers on staff, GE’s software revenues are about $2.5 billion and the company expects double-digit growth from now until 2015.
Today, GE announced what would be a new dynamo powering this growth: a new Global Software Center, located in San Ramon, California. The center will hire and house 400 software engineers and other professionals developing digital tools that gather and analyze the millions of gigabytes of data generated by controls, sensors, computers and other parts of the brains of industrial machines. These tools will predict and respond to changes, and guide customers in how to best use their assets.
It’s the kind of work that went into GE’s rail Movement Planner and Trip Optimizer. The program gets locomotives to talk to each other, loop in traffic control systems, freight loaders, and technicians with their smartphones. This is no idle talk: a railroad can increase speeds up to 20%, cut fuel consumption by 10%, and save as much as $200 million in capital and expenses annually.
The San Ramon facility will be GE’s “nerve center for software” and link to other GE businesses and software engineers. Mark Little, GE’s Chief Technology Officer, says that the center will promote collaboration across GE and its diverse group customers. “On any given day, one of our software experts could be working on a clean energy project, while at the same time contributing to a program that improves the delivery of health care,” says Little.

K@run@

Saturday, October 1, 2011

BRAND NAMES

ABN AMRO - In the 1960s, the Nederlandse Handelmaatschappij (Dutch Trading Society; 1824) and the Twentsche Bank merged to form the Algemene Bank Nederland ( ABN; General Bank of the Netherlands) . In 1966, the Amsterdamsche Bank and the Rotterdamsche Bank merged to form the Amro Bank. In 1991, ABN and Amro Bank merged to form ABN AMRO.

Accenture - Accent on the Future. Greater-than ‘accent’ over the logo’s t points forward towards the future. The name Accenture was proposed by a company employee in Norwayas part of a internal name finding process (BrandStorming) . Prior to January 1, 2001 the company was called Andersen Consulting.

Adidas - from the name of the founder Adolf (Adi) Dassler.

Adobe - came from name of the river Adobe Creek that ran behind the houses of founders John Warnock and Chuck Geschke .

AltaVista - Spanish for “high view”.

Amazon*com - Founder Jeff Bezos renamed the company to Amazon (from the earlier name of Cadabra*com) after the world’s most voluminous river, the Amazon. He saw the potential for a larger volume of sales in an online bookstore as opposed to the then prevalent bookstores. (Alternative: It is said that Jeff Bezos named his book store Amazon simply to cash in on the popularity of Yahoo at the time. Yahoo listed entries alphabetically, and thus Amazon would always appear above its competitors in the relevant categories it was listed in.)

AMD - Advanced Micro Devices.

Apache - The name was chosen from respect for the Native American Indian tribe of Apache (Ind), well-known for their superior skills in warfare strategy and their inexhaustible endurance. Secondarily, and more popularly (though incorrectly) accepted, it’s considered a cute name that stuck: its founders got started by applying patches to code written for NCSA’s httpd daemon. The result was ‘a patchy’ server — thus the name Apache.

Apple - for the favourite fruit of co-founder Steve Jobs and/or for the time he worked at an apple orchard. He was three months late in filing a name for the business, and he threatened to call his company Apple Computer if his colleagues didn’t suggest a better name by 5 p.m. Apple’s Macintosh is named after a popular variety of apple sold in the US. Apple also wanted to distance itself from the cold, unapproachable, complicated imagery created by the other computer companies at the time had names like IBM, NEC, DEC, ADPAC, Cincom, Dylakor, Input, Integral Systems, SAP, PSDI, Syncsort and Tesseract. The new company sought to reverse the entrenched view of computers in order to get people to use them at home. They looked for a name that was unlike the names of traditional computer companies, a name that also supported a brand positioning strategy that was to be perceived as simple, warm, human, approachable and different. Note: Apple had to get approval from the Beatle’s Apple Corps to use the name ‘Apple’ and paid a one-time royalty of $100,000 to McIntosh Laboratory, Inc., a maker of high-end audio equipment, to use the derivative name ‘Macintosh’, known now as just ‘Mac’.

AT&T - American Telephone and Telegraph Corporation officially changed its name to AT&T in the 1990s.

Bauknecht - Founded as an electrotechnical workshop in 1919 by Gottlob Bauknecht . BBC - Stands for British Broadcasting Corporation.

BenQ - Bringing ENjoyment and Quality to life.

Blaupunkt - Blaupunkt (Blue dot) was founded in 1923 under the name Ideal. Their core business was the manufacturing of headphones. If the headphones came through quality tests, the company would give the headphones a blue dot. The headphones quickly became known as the blue dots or blaue Punkte. The quality symbol would become a trademark, and the trademark would become the company name in 1938.

BMW - abbreviation of Bayerische Motoren Werke (Bavarian Motor Factories)

Borealis - The Northern Lights or Aurora Borealis, is the celestial phenomenon that features bursts of light in colourful patterns dancing across the night skies of the north. Borealis, inspired from the shining brilliance of the Northern Lights, was formed in 1994 out of the merger between two northern oil companies, Norway’s Statoil and Finland’s Neste.

BP - formerly British Petroleum, now “BP” (The slogan “Beyond Petroleum” has incorrectly been taken to refer to the company’s new name following its rebranding effort in 2000).

BRAC - abbreviation for Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee, world’s largest NGO (non governmental organization) . It works in development programs around the world.

Bridgestone - named after founder Shojiro Ishibashi. The surname Ishibashi (?) means “stone bridge”, i.e. “bridge of stone”.

Bull - Compagnie des machines Bull was founded in Paristo exploit the patents for punched card machines taken out by a Norwegian engineer, Fredrik Rosing Bull.

Cadillac - Cadillac was named after the 18th century French explorer Antoine Laumet de La Mothe , sieur de Cadillac, founder of Detroit, Michigan. Cadillac is a small town in the South of France.

Canon - Originally (1933) Precision Optical Instruments Laboratory the new name (1935) derived from the name of the company’s first camera, the Kwannon, in turn named after the Japanese name of the Buddhist bodhisattva of mercy.

CGI - from the first letter of Information Management Consultant in french (Conseiller en Gestion et Informatique) .

Cisco - short for San Francisco . It has also been suggested that it was “CIS-co” — Computer Information Services was the department at StanfordUniversityt hat the founders worked in.

COBRA - Computadores Brasileiros, “Brazilian Computers”, electronics and services company, was the first state-owned designer and producer of computers in the 1970s, later acquired by the Banco do Brasil.

Coca-Cola - Coca-Cola’s name is derived from the coca leaves and kola nuts used as flavoring. Coca-Cola creator John S. Pemberton changed the ‘K’ of kola to ‘C’ for the name to look better.

Colgate-Palmolive - formed from a merger of soap manufacturers Colgate & Company and Palmolive-Peet. Peet was dropped in 1953. Colgate was named after William Colgate, an English immigrant, who set up a starch, soap and candle business in New York Cityin 1806. Palmolive was named for the two oils (Palm and Olive) used in its manufacture.

Compaq - from “comp” for computer, and “pack” to denote a small integral object; or: Compatibility And Quality; or: from the company’s first product, the very compact Compaq Portable.

Comsat - an American digital telecommunications and satellite company, founded during the President Kennedy era to develop the technology. Contraction of Communications Satellites.

Daewoo - the company founder Kim Woo Chong called it Daewoo which means “Great Universe” in Korean.

Dell - named after its founder, Michael Dell. The company changed its name from Dell Computer in 2003.

DHL - the company was founded by Adrian Dalsey, Larry Hillblom , and Robert Lynn , whose last initials form the company’s moniker.

eBay - Pierre Omidyar, who had created the Auction Web trading website, had formed a web consulting concern called Echo Bay Technology Group. ” EchoBay” didn’t refer to the town in Nevada, the nature area close to Lake Mead, or any real place. “It just sounded cool,” Omidyar reportedly said. When he tried to register EchoBay.com, though, he found that Echo Bay Mines, a gold mining company, had gotten it first. So, Omidyar registered what (at the time) he thought was the second best name: eBay.com.

Epson - Epson Seiko Corporation, the Japanese printer and peripheral manufacturer, was named from “Son of Electronic Printer”

Fanta - was originally invented by Max Keith in Germanyin 1940 when World War II made it difficult to get the Coca-Cola syrup to Nazi Germany. Fanta was originally made from byproducts of cheese and jam production. The name comes from the German word for imagination (Fantasie or Phantasie), because the inventors thought that imagination was needed to taste oranges from the strange mix.

Fazer - named after its founder, Karl Fazer.

Fiat - acronym of Fabbrica Italiana Automobili Torino (Italian Factory of Cars of Turin). Fuji - from the highest Japanese mountain Mount Fuji.

Google - the name is an intentional misspelling of the word googol, reflecting the company’s mission to organize the immense amount of information available online.

Haier - Chinese ? “sea” and ? (a transliteration character; also means “you” in Literary Chinese)

HP - Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard tossed a coin to decide whether the company they founded would be called Hewlett-Packard or Packard-Hewlett.

Hitachi - old place name, literally “sunrise”

Honda - from the name of its founder, Soichiro Honda

Honeywell - from the name of Mark Honeywell founder of Honeywell Heating Specialty Co. It later merged with Minneapolis Heat Regulator Company and was finally called Honeywell Inc. in 1963.

Hotmail - Founder Jack Smith got the idea of accessing e-mail via the web from a computer anywhere in the world. When Sabeer Bhatia came up with the business plan for the mail service, he tried all kinds of names ending in ‘mail’ and finally settled for Hotmail as it included the letters “HTML” – the markup language used to write web pages. It was initially referred to as HoTMaiL with selective upper casing. (If you click on Hotmail’s ‘mail’ tab, you will still find “HoTMaiL” in the URL.) HSBC - The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation.

Hyundai - connotes the sense of “the present age” or “modernity” in Korean.

IBM - named by Tom Watson, an ex-employee of National Cash Register. To one-up them in all respects, he called his company International Business Machines.

ICL- abbreviation for International Computers Ltd, once the UK’s largest computer company, but now a service arm of Fujitsu, of Japan.

IKON - copier company name derived from I Know One Name.

Intel - Bob Noyce and Gordon Moore initially incorporated their company as N M Electronics. Someone suggested Moore Noyce Electronics but it sounded too close to “more noise” — not a good choice for an electronics company! Later, Integrated Electronics was proposed but it had been taken by somebody else. Then, using initial syllables from INTegrated ELectronics, Noyce and Moore came up with Intel. To avoid potential conflicts with other companies of similar names, Intel purchased the name rights for $15,000 from a company called Intelco. (Source: Intel 15 Years Corporate Anniversary Brochure)

Interland - a web hosting provider formally known as Micron Computer, Inc. which was named either after InternetLandor the combination of the largest acqusition it performed, Interliant with the word Land.

K@run@

Friday, September 23, 2011

BRAND NAMES


Adobe - came from name of the river Adobe Creek that ran behind thehouse of founder John Warnock.


Apache - It got its name because its founders got started by applying patchesto code written for NCSA's httpd daemon. The result was 'A PAtCHy'server -- thus, the name Apache


Apple Computers - favorite fruit of founder Steve Jobs. He was three monthslate in filing a name for the business, and he threatened to call his company AppleComputers if the other colleagues didn't suggest a better name by 5 o'clock.


CISCO - its not an acronym but the short for San Francisco.


Google -the name started as a jokey boast about the amount of informationthe search-engine would be able to search. It was originally named 'Googol',a word for the number represented by 1 followed by 100 zeros. After founders,Stanford grad students Sergey Brin and Larry Page presented their project toan angel investor, they received a cheque made out to 'Google'


Hotmail - Founder Jack Smith got the idea of accessing e-mail via the webfrom a computer anywhere in the world. When Sabeer Bhatia came up withthe business plan for the mail service, he tried all kinds of names ending in'mail' and finally settled for hotmail as it included the letters "html" - theprogramming language used to write web pages. It was initially referred toas HoTMaiL with selective upper casing.


HP - Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard tossed a coin to decide whether thecompany they founded would be called Hewlett-Packard or Packard-Hewlett.


Intel - Bob Noyce and Gordon Moore wanted to name their new company'Moore Noyce' but that was already trademarked by a hotel chain, so theyhad to settle for an acronym of INTegrated ELectronics.


Lotus (Notes) - Mitch Kapor got the name for his company from 'The LotusPosition' or 'Padmasana'. Kapor used to be a teacher of TranscendentalMeditation (by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi).


Microsoft - coined by Bill Gates to represent the company that was devoted toMICROcomputer SOFTware. Originally christened Micro-Soft, the '-' was removed later on.


Motorola - Founder Paul Galvin came up with this name when his company started manufacturing radios for cars. The popular radio company at the timewas called Victrola.


ORACLE - Larry Ellison and Bob Oats were working on a consulting project for the CIA (Central Intelligence Agency). The code name for the project was called Oracle (acronym for: One Real Asshole Called Larry Ellison)


Red Hat - Company founder Marc Ewing was given the Cornell lacrosse teamcap (with red and white stripes) while at college by his grandfather. He lost it andhad to search for it desperately. The manual of the beta version of Red Hat Linuxhad an appeal to readers to return his Red Hat if found by anyone !


SAP - "Systems, Applications, Products in Data Processing", formed by 4 ex-IBMemployees who used to work in the 'Systems/Applications/Projects"


SUN - founded by 4 Stanford University buddies, SUN is the acronym for StanfordUniversity Network.


Xerox - The inventor, Chestor Carlson, named his product trying to say 'dry' (asit was dry copying, markedly different from the then prevailing wet copying).The Greek root 'xer' means dry.


Yahoo! - the word was invented by Jonathan Swift and used in his book 'Gulliver'sTravels'. It represents a person who is repulsive in appearance and action and isbarely human. Yahoo! founders Jerry Yang and David Filo selected the namebecause they considered themselves yahoos.


K@run@